HELL TOWN and OCCUPYING ED headline NCGLFF this weekend

HELL TOWN and OCCUPYING ED are opening night selections at the North Carolina Gay & Lesbian Film Festival this weekend.  The screening times are as follows.  Actors Owen Lawless and BeckiJo Neill will be there with me to present the film and do a Q&A.

HELL TOWN
AUG 14 @ 11 PM
AUG 15 @ 11:20 PM
AUG 19 @ 9:20 PM

OCCUPYING ED
AUG 14 @ 6:45 PM
AUG 16 @ 10:50 AM
AUG 19 @ 7:10 PM

THE CAROLINA THEATRE OF DURHAM
309 WEST MORGAN ST / DURHAM, NC 27701

FEAR DOESN’T EXIST

Fear doesn’t exist, it’s created.  The anxiety we feel which can make fear comes from either not knowing something, or actual danger.  Danger exists, sure; but that isn’t fear.  It’s possible to erase fear from our entire lives if we simply understand what it is that’s provoking us to create fear.  I know it’s possible because I’ve been successful at eliminating it from my experience.

Someone I was working with recently has anxiety over legal agreements.  Somewhere along the way while growing up he decided that legal jargon was “over his head” and “confusing” and so on.  Because he decided these ideas, he created a fear that paralyzes him whenever he’s in a situation where a contract must be signed.

I explained each sentence to him one at a time.  It was very difficult because the fear he’d created was so intense, that although he understood each time I taught him what the words meant, he’d fall back into fear the moment I stopped talking.

Eventually, I pointed out to him that he had made some decisions to just be afraid, and that if he wanted to, he had the power to remove the fear by making decisions to understand the English language (which of course he already knew, and well, as he’s a writer).

People are crippled by fear all the time, and when I tell people they have the power to remove fear from their lives simply by finding out what triggers that fear inside them, they look totally befuddled.

If you’d like to remove fear from your life – maybe from a specific place you hold fear (such as fear of snakes, spiders, and so on), or maybe a more significant fear (such as fear of flying, driving, social interaction, and so on) – simply book some consulting time with me and we’ll tackle your fears together.  Depending on the topic, it usually is something we can conquer fairly easily and in a short amount of time.

THE LITTLE RED HEN

Once upon a time, in a small, cozy little house, a little red hen lived with her chicks. The little red hen worked very hard taking care of her house and her family. She was a happy little hen, and she sang cheerful songs as she did her chores.

The little red hen had three friends–a cat, a dog, and a pig–who lived very near her. Every day she watched her three friends playing, but the little red hen didn’t have time to play. She was too busy with her chicks and her house.

The little red hen started each day early in the morning. First she cooked breakfast for all her chicks. Then she made the beds and tended her garden. She cooked the meals, washed the clothes, and scrubbed the floors. She worked hard from morning till night.

But her three lazy friends–the cat, the dog, and the pig–never seemed to work at all. They went for long walks in the sunshine, lay about in the soft grass, and spent their time reading stories and playing games.

One sunny day the little red hen was outside working hard in her garden. She looked down at the ground where she was pulling some weeds, and she noticed some grains of wheat. “Who will plant this wheat?” the little red hen asked her three friends.

“Not I,” said the cat.
“Not I,” said the dog.
“Not I,” said the pig.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen.

The little red hen planted the grains of wheat. Soon the wheat grew. The little red hen looked at the growing wheat and asked, “Who will help me tend this wheat?”

“Not I,” said the cat.
“Not I,” said the dog.
“Not I,” said the pig.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen to her three friends.

The days went by, and the little red hen worked very hard farming the wheat. She watered the field and hoed the ground and pulled the weeds. Finally the wheat was ripe and ready to be harvested. The little red hen asked, “Who will help me cut all of this wheat?”

“Not I,” said the cat.
“Not I,” said the dog.
“Not I,” said the pig.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen.

The little red hen worked from morning to night cutting the golden wheat. When she finished harvesting all of the wheat, she loaded it onto her wagon. The little red hen looked at the wagon filled with wheat and asked, “Who will help me take the wheat to the mill to be ground into flour?”

“Not I,” said the cat.
“Not I,” said the dog.
“Not I,” said the pig.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen to her three friends.

The little red hen walked a long way into the village. She pulled her wagon of wheat behind her. When she got to the village, she went to see the miller. “Will you grind this wheat into flour for me?” asked the little red hen. “Oh yes,” said the miller. “This wheat will make enough good flour for bread for all your chicks.”

The miller ground the wheat into flour, and the little red hen set out for home. This time, in her wagon, she had a large sack of flour to make bread. When the little red hen came back to her house, her three lazy friends were waiting for her. She showed them the flour. “Now I shall bake some bread with the flour,” said the little red hen. “Who will help me bake the bread?”

“Not I,” said the cat.
“Not I,” said the dog.
“Not I,” said the pig.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen, and she began to wonder if the three were really friends.

When the bread was baked, the little red hen asked, “Who will help me eat the bread?”

“I will!” said the cat.
“I will!” said the dog.
“I will!” said the pig.

But the little red hen stamped her foot and said angrily to the cat, the dog, and the pig, “Oh no. I found the wheat. I planted the wheat. I tended the wheat. I harvested the wheat. I took the wheat to be ground into flour. And I made the bread.”

Then the little red hen said, “All these things I did by myself. Now my chicks and I will eat this bread all by ourselves!”

And they did.

The End

FEAST OF FUN podcast interview

I was recently interviewed on the hit podcast FEAST OF FUN (you can subscribe on iTunes).  It was a great visit with Marc and Fausto, and at the time of this writing more than 24,000 people listened to the interview!

We talked about my friend the great actress Karen Black, filming EL GANZO in Mexico, digging up bodies on alleyways, punk rock royalty Pleasant Gehman, and the other current film I have on the festival circuit: HELL TOWN.  They also got me to talk about being betrayed by my ex the sociopath, but unfortunately the last half of our interview (which had to do primarily with commentary from the guys on the Rachel Dolezal crisis, during which I basically said nothing for 10 minutes) was cut when ProTools stopped recording without the guys being notified.

You can listen to the podcast HERE or at this link: http://feastoffun.com/podcast/2015/06/18/fof-2180-hell-yes-to-hell-town/

Enjoy!  I really loved my visit with FEAST OF FUN and am excited to share it with those of you who haven’t heard it yet.

EL GANZO sneak preview Sunday

EL GANZO will have a special screening on Sunday (28 June) at 1pm as part of the Free State Festival in Lawrence, Kansas.  I will be there with Susan Traylor and some of the cast/crew to do a Q&A after the film.

The day prior (Saturday 27 June), at 10:30 AM, I’ll be giving an introduction to my process used in the Maverick Filmmaking Workshop for the festival which is FREE to attend.

Both the EL GANZO screening and the Maverick Filmmaking Workshop will happen at the Lawrence Arts Center.  For directions, visit the FREE STATE FESTIVAL website at that link.

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EDDIE ROTTEN reviews HELL TOWN

Sometimes when you walk into a theater, your attention is drawn to the floor, where thousands of pop corn pieces crunch below your feet. And the seat you find has plenty of room, but the screaming child next to you, convinces you that his desire is to annoy you and prevent you from watching what was supposed to be “The best thing since Friday the 13th”. Well, watching a movie at Austins Lakeline, Alamo Drafthouse was nothing at all like that. PROPS to having a clean, kick ass place to watch bad ass movies! The food was killer, the seats were to die for, and there was more beer on tap than I can ever remember…. Seriously, there were lots of original beer.

My name is Eddie Rotten. I’m host of the Zombie Life Podcast. And myself and crew (Red Rum, Lisa Deadly, & Eric the Producer) were invited to watch the World Premier of HELL TOWN. Our podcast is a humble one, but our goal is to have fun, with fun people. And there could be no other perfect group of humans than the directors and cast of HELL TOWN!!!

We were fortunate enough to interview the award-winning directors Steve Balderson and Elizabeth Spear, along with cast members Kyle Eno, Owen Lawless, Sarah Napier, and BeckiJo Neill. And right from the very start, it was a party!

After about 2 minutes of quick talk, I threw my notes away completely, and decided to have an unscripted conversation with some incredibly talented, and funny people. The energy this cast had was contagious. I giggled… a lot! Director Steve Balderson has a presence that anyone would want to cling to and learn from, and it shows in how close his cast is. They all were in love with the story when they first read it and decided to jump in head first, make a small life sacrifice, and make this awesome film.

Lets talk about the film.

Hell Town takes place around a small group of friends, and a football team by the name of, the HELLIONS. Tell me that’s not bad ass! A plot develops, including jealousy, questionable sexuality, people turn up missing, no one knows who to blame, and bingo! You have the most original and bizarre horror comedy ever created. Elizabeth Spear and Steve Balderson guide their story through some of the most uncomfortably hilarious moments I have ever seen on the silver screen. The packed movie house was littered with screams, laughing, clapping, OH MY GOD bursts, and even a couple dry heaves by our wonderful Producer Eric.

To the very end of Hell Town, there is no prediction on what will happen. The movie is filmed as a Soap Opera. But much, much better. If Days of Our Lives was half this good the world would be a better place. Inside our interview, we were told by Steve Balderson, that a fire had destroyed a large part of their film, and we would see 3 episodes of Hell Town. In my humble opinion, I can dream upon dreams that there will be more Hell Town in the future, but I was so pleased at what I saw. It could stand alone as its own film, with no follow up, and still kick ass! Everything from the music production, to make up and lighting was stunning. Never did I once feel that it was a lower budget film, and that is testament to the power and creativity of Steve Balderson and Elizabeth Spear’s direction superiority.

Hell Town is a refreshing film. It’s a fun film. It’s a film that you want to take someone to, then drop them off and go back to watch it again. It’s not over saturated with character building, yet leaves you feeling oddly close to a character when they die a bloody, violent, hatchet swinging death…. just playing. That didn’t happen. No spoilers here, but seriously, you leave feeling satisfied, but ready for more. And when you get to watch it with the people that made it? Well, hell… there’s not many things cooler than that now is there?!

Austin Horror Society did a Q and A with the directors and cast of Hell Town after the film was over. The cast was open to questions and honest with their answers.What an incredible evening!

In the end, if Steve Balderson and Elizabeth Spear decide to continue the legacy of HELL TOWN, I for one will be first in line, with my HELLIONS Letterman Jacket on. I want to thank them and the cast for making movies fun to go to again, and doing it with bloody elegance, and seemingly effortless direction. Two thumbs way, way up.

Your Hellion for life
EDDIE ROTTEN
ZOMBIE LIFE PODCAST

*HELL TOWN screens this Saturday 16 May at 7 PM in Charleston, SC where it is nominated for 6 Crimson Screen Horror Awards.  For details visit www.DIKENGA.com

ZombieLife talks to HELL TOWN cast/crew

This radio interview with Eddie Rotten and ZombieLife Podcast was one of the coolest experiences I’ve had.  I was joined on the night of the HELL TOWN premiere (presented by the Austin Horror Society at the Alamo Drafthouse) with Elizabeth Spear, Owen Lawless, BeckiJo Neill, Kyle Eno and Sarah Napier.  Listen to our interview HERE or by clicking the logo below.

ZombieLife logo 2

Next HELL TOWN screening is in Charleston, SC at Crimson Screen Horror Film Fest on May 16.  Details at www.DIKENGA.com

 

Interview with HELL TOWN co-director Elizabeth Spear

The Austin Horror Society presents the world premiere of my new film HELL TOWN tomorrow night in Austin, Texas at the Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline.  Tell all your friends in Austin to go see it!

Here’s an interview with co-director Elizabeth Spear on KOOP 91.7FM in Austin.

http://www.lightscameraaustin.net/elizabeth-spear-april-2015.html

HELL TOWN: Review by UK film critic MJ Simpson

HELL TOWN
Review by UK film critic MJ SImpson

For those of us who have been following Steve Balderson’s career, Hell Town is exactly what we have come to expect, in that it is completely unexpected. For starters, it’s a horror film. A black comedy, certainly, but revolving around a serial killer, and some of the deaths are quite unpleasant and gruesome (in a blackly comic sort of way).

Steve’s work has bordered on horror before: Pep Squad was a tale of high school psychopathic murder dark enough to play at genre festivals like Fantasporto (where I saw it, and first met Steve’s producer father Clark). His sophomore work (and magnum opus), the stunning Firecracker certainly contained some disturbingly horrific elements, not least its Browning-ian use of real sideshow freaks. And before Pep Squad Steve even made an amateur, feature-length vampire film. But this is his first full-bodied horror flick.

It’s also a soap opera. Not figuratively or metaphorically but literally. Taking the concept of the three-act structure to its logical conclusion, Steve and co-director Elizabeth Spear have fashioned the story as three consecutive mid-season episodes of a fictitious TV serial, including opening and closing credits (inspired partly by the modern habit of watching TV episodes back to back in a ‘box set’). The acting is deliberately mannered (as is the direction) but not over-the-top or played for laughs. We’re not watching Acorn Antiques here.

The story concerns two families: the Manlys and the Gables. Trish Gable (Krysten Day, a regular at Wamego’s Columbian Theatre) is the perky, peppy blonde prom queen looking to give away her “other virginity” to the right guy. Her bitter, jealous sister Laura is played by BeckiJo Neill in ‘episode 7’ and then recast without explanation from ‘episode 8’ onwards in the person of Jennifer Grace (Marybelle in The Casserole Club), who looks almost nothing at all like her predecessor. Bobby (Blake Cordell) is their slender, effete brother who is not entirely out. Moody emo BJ (Sarah Napier) and their father (Jeff Montague) complete the family. (Montague is missing from the IMDB cast list, possibly because of… well, you can google the guy.)

The Manly boys do their best to live up to their name by wandering around shirtless for much of the film. There’s Blaze Manly (Matt Weight, also co-producer: Ian in Occupying Ed), his brothers Butch (Ben Windholz) and Jesse (Owen Lawless) plus sister Chanel (Amanda Deibert, standing out among a strong cast). Deibert was Tiffany in The Far Flung Star and Lucy in Occupying Ed; she has horror previous including Andrew Muto’s Blood Runs Black and was even in a Creep Creepersin movie! Chanel is Trish Gable’s nemesis and, in a running gag, works in every dining/retail establishment in town. Of course, it wouldn’t be a Steve Balderson joint without a role for Pleasant Gehman and here you get two Plezes for the price of one. She is ‘Mother Manly’, lying comatose on a bed throughout, and also the scheming nurse who cares for her.

Among all the unrequited crushes, backstabbing bitchiness, repressed sexuality, sibling rivalry and general small-town angst, there is the little matter of the ‘Letter Jacket Killer’ who is offing local youngsters in a variety of sadistic ways. Well, I say ‘youngsters’ but in the grand tradition of American movies, all these ‘high school students’ are clearly in their mid-twenties. And within the artificiality of the soap opera conceit, that is exactly as it should be.

The two-headed directorial beast that is Steve and Liz manages proceedings with an acute awareness of both soaps and slashers, never missing a trick for a camera cliché, a hackneyed line of dialogue or an overwrought bit of plotting. It’s a truism that you have to be very good at something in order to effectively lampoon a bad version of that thing without yourself appearing bad, and that’s certainly the case here (the sine qua non of this principle is, in my humble opinion, the Bonzos track ‘Jazz, Delicious Hot, Disgusting Cold’ – what do you mean, you’ve never heard it?). Anyway, Steve is of course a hugely talented and experienced film-maker whose career I have been following for the best part of two decades. Elizabeth Spear is a new name to me.

According to the IMDB (and with all the caveats such a phrase implies) she has made seven previous features since 2003, including dramas, comedies, a documentary, a war film; some of them co-directed with other people. It would seem from Hell Town that she meshes well with Steve B. But then a real TV soap would have different directors for different episodes anyway.

I’m no soap-watcher but I do like a nice slice of horror and Hell Town works admirably as a pastiche of the slasher genre, benefitting (I believe) from having been made by somebody who normally works well outside said genre. Far too many ‘slasher comedies’ are lamentably unfunny and self-indulgent: of interest only to obsessive slasher fans, the sort who don’t care about character, only about deaths. By presenting the tale of the Letter Jacket Killer as a slice of soap opera, Steve and Liz foreground the characters. And although some of the minor ones outside of the two main families have little time to register before becoming bloody corpses, we can infer that we would have known them a whole lot better if we had seen Season One and the preceding six episodes of Season Two. (There is an opening caption explaining that the entire first and third seasons on Hell Town have been lost, and I really hope that Steve makes a lot more of this fictitious ‘real story’ behind the series when he starts publicising Hell Town, mainly because there’s so much fun to be had there.)

Jake Jackson supplied the excellent special effects make-up for the various kills. This is his second film gig following a thriller called Erasure; he has also worked on stage productions of Shrek, Young Frankenstein and The Tempest. Nancy Cox provided the regular hair and make-up.

Several of the supporting cast were also in Occupying Ed and The Far Flung Star. Michael Page, Connor Lloyd Crews and Chris Pudlo all receive ‘additional writing’ credits. Cinematographer Daniel G Stephens, who has previously worked with both directors, credited here with ‘special photographic effects’, lights every scene with a TV sensibility that doesn’t detract from the movie experience. And an extra special treat for long-time Balderfans is the return to the fold of the legend that is Betty O, for the first time since Stuck!, here appearing as a TV news reporter.

Hell Town is a hoot to watch and gives every impression of having been a hoot to make, which I think is characteristic of Steve’s films in this  part of his career. It’s not quite up there with the wonderful Occupying Ed, partly because the soap opera conceit necessarily robs the film of a layer of sincerity. On the other hand, I much preferred it to Steve’s two lightweight international capers The Far Flung Star and Culture Shock. It’s a real treat to see Steve working within the horror genre and bringing that unique Wamego touch to the tired tropes and corny clichés that we all know and love.

MJS rating: A-

# # #

On April 23, 2015, The Austin Horror Society will present the world premiere of HELL TOWN in Austin Texas at the Alamo Drafthouse.  For details visit the website: www.DIKENGA.com

RECYCLING CRITICS by Jim Meskimen

Many moons ago I read this great article written by an actor friend from Los Angeles, and posted it to my website.  I rediscovered it recently, and would like to share.  Enjoy!

RECYCLING CRITICS
by Jim Meskimen

I’m not much of a fan of critics, especially these days when there are such an abundance of them on the payrolls of every newspaper, e-zine, cable TV show, news program and magazine. I think when professional critics start to outnumber working artists, something is terribly wrong. Even one critic to ten artists is a bit uneven. Critics will disagree with me, but to listen to some of them, one artist per field of art would be ample.

It’s not the individual critics I hate, mind you, it’s the whole impulse. I even hate it in me, and consider it one of my projects to evaporate any desire towards criticism of other well-intentioned people that I can detect in myself. It’s just not a handsome attribute.

So here’s my idea, and I’m almost serious about it, too. Today we have recourse to digital tools that have revolutionized the arts. You can paint, compose music, edit films, design buildings, all on your laptop while chewing a Krispy Kreme donut, if you choose. Basically, there is no excuse anymore for anyone who claims to be interested in the arts to not be very productive. It’s just too easy.

So we as a society should demand that anyone who wants to call themselves a professional critic, should make available on a website for all the world to see, an example of their efforts in the very field they intend to be an authority on. Music critics- let’s hear your songs and symphonies. Theatre critics- where is the play you wrote on the subway to Times Square? Art critics- let’s see the images you made on your laptop in Soho. Film critics – you hordes of imitation butter-flavor fingered typists, tell us where to view your short film please. We’ll patiently wait for the download.

This will make honest men and women out of the few really devoted critics who take on the challenge, and it will thin the herd considerably. With every critic activated as a productive artist, we will have more works to view and listen to, and less carping and complaining. Many will probably quit of their own accord, since artistic creation is so much more rewarding than casual, random destruction.

The real dividend for the culture will be the conversion of critics into artists. We always need more of the one, and seldom have a hunger for the other.