SCHEDULING: PART 1 OF 2

You do not need any fancy, expensive, or magic movie making software to schedule a movie.  You simply need some note cards, scotch tape, and Microsoft Word.

To begin the scheduling process, buy a stack of colored note cards.

Colored note cards

Each note card will represent a scene from your script.  Use yellow cards for all exterior “day” scenes, green cards for interior “day” scenes, blue for inside “night” scenes, and purple for exterior “night” scenes.

To make a card, match the card color to the scene in your script.  Is it inside, outside, day or night?

On the top of each note card, write in the scene number and name.  Then write a brief description of the scene.  On the right, list the characters in that scene, and at the bottom, any special props or unique elements (such as a car, animal, special effects, etc).  Then, at the top right corner, put the amount of time you think it will take to shoot that scene.

How long will it take you to shoot the scene?  That’s up to you.  Think about it from the standpoint of shooting difficulty.  Is it a scene filled with action and multiple shots?  Maybe you’ll want to give yourself an extra 30-45 minutes.  Or, maybe it’s one camera set up but two pages of dialogue that you think you’d be able to do in less than an hour.

I average an hour of shooting time per one page of the script.  So if my scene is two pages long, I’ll write down “2 hrs” at the top of the note card.  If it’s half a page, I’ll write down “30 mins.”

Then, once I have all the note cards done for each scene in the entire script, I will separate them into piles based on location.  All the scenes/cards to be filmed at the “diner” in one pile, all the cards for “hotel” in another.  And so forth.

Once you’ve separated the cards into location piles, you can begin organizing them into “shooting days.”

To do this, lay the cards on the table and count the hours.  I try to keep the shooting times each day right around 8 hours total.  (Later, when you add in breaks, travel time, lunches, dinners, etc, you’ll see that 8 hours shooting time is plenty; more than 8 hrs makes for a long day.  On the flipside, 6 or 7 hours for shoot time is divine).

If your locations are shorter, say, you have just two cards for the “hotel” which add up to 3 hours, set those aside.  Either that day at the hotel will be very light, or you’ll match it up with another location and move sets mid-day.

When you’re finished organizing them, lightly tape the cards together on the reverse side (so if you need to move cards around later on, you won’t tear the front off).

Then, tape the strips of days up on your wall.

Shooting days

Each vertical strip of cards represents one shooting day.  At the top of each strip I put a pink card that says the location.  If you are doing a feature, and organizing scenes based on roughly an hour’s shoot time per page, you should have somewhere between 12 and 18 days, give or take.  Of course, that can be shorter if you aren’t changing locations, or longer, if, say, half of your movie takes place in Hong Kong (you’ll add a day travel time just flying there).

Feel free to rearrange the strips of “days” until you are comfortable with the order of locations.  I always try and select an easy location to start, as the first day on set is always the one that should be the lightest.

rearranging the strips

In the next blog post, we’ll open up Microsoft Word and make the shooting schedule.

(If you need help creating your note cards, I’m available for consulting via telephone or Skype.)

VANITY ON THE CLOCK

If you’ve worked on a film set, you know how important it is to remain on schedule.  The art of scheduling a movie accurately is really one of the most important parts of the filmmaking process.

In order to schedule a movie, clear communication needs to take place between the crew and cast who will shape it.  Some DP’s will want to spend hours lighting “that shot” while some actors want another hour to prep for the scene – and soon you’re behind schedule.

The first thing I do is limit the DP set up time.  If he or she has truly given it some thought, there will be an easy way to light nearly any scene in less than 15-30 minutes.  On any given budget.  But, it takes the self-discipline to be able to sit down and plan it.  If you wait to decide what to do until you show up on the set, you won’t know what you’re doing until you get there.  In that case, you will not be prepared and it could take a long time before the camera team is ready to get the shot.

Another thing I do is tell my actors to show up Make-Up and Hair ready.  In some cases I have hired a hair and make-up person, but I tell them to be in charge of their own schedule.  And if Hillary needs to be camera ready at 3pm, she should be on set at 3pm.  It’s the responsibility of the make-up artist and Hillary to make sure this happens.

Preferably there won’t be any make-up or hair person, and each actor can just be responsible for doing it themselves.  If my actor isn’t comfortable doing it on their own,  they can hire their own make-up artist.  I’m happy to give the artist credit in the movie, but they most likely won’t be a part of our overall schedule and planning process.

I understand that everyone wants to look his or her best whether it’s in front of or behind the camera.  The DP wants the best lighting, the actors want to look their best, the props, costumes, all of it.  Each person wants to achieve their best.  And I think that’s great!  When I’m directing something, I want it to be the best possible experience for the viewer.  So I totally get everyone wanting to be and do his or her best.

What I don’t understand is how few people are really willing to take responsibility for themselves to make sure they achieve their goals.  I sketch storyboards before showing up on the set.  There’s no reason the DP can’t look at them and design his lighting plan in advance.  There’s no reason the actors can’t look at them and know which side of their face will be seen.

I made my storyboards available to the cast and crew of FIRECRACKER and I believe only about four people (out of 42) looked at them.  Karen Black was one of them.  There was only one moment Karen didn’t like where I was putting the camera.  But, I told her that now wasn’t the time for that discussion.  The time for conversation was all those weeks earlier when we went through each storyboard together.

Since I filmed FIRECRACKER, I’ve never had an unorganized shooting day.  And I’ve never been behind schedule.  Even if I’ve experienced a scene running over the pre-planned time, I average about an hour ahead of the scheduled wrap time each day.

Yes, it is possible to make a feature film wherein you don’t have to work 12-14 hours a day.  The trick is to check vanity at the door, really communicate with clarity and focus, and work with people who love taking responsibility for managing themselves realistically.